Magnesium and hydrochloric acid coursework

Rate of Reaction of Magnesium and Hydrochloric Acid Introduction In acid-base chemical reactions, there are four main variables, which influence the rate of reaction. These include the presence or absence of catalyst, temperature, concentration, and surface area of reactants. Temperature influences the rates of reaction through kinetic energy, such that high temperatures increase the kinetic energy of reacting molecules therefore causing frequent collisions, which form products faster.

Magnesium and hydrochloric acid coursework

Courseworks 7 pages, words Aim The aim of this investigation is to find out how concentration of acid affects the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon. The rate of a chemical reaction is a measure of how fast the reaction takes place. It is important to remember that a rapid reaction is completed in a short period of time.

Some reactions are very fast, e. In this investigation we will test different concentrations of acid reacting with magnesium.

Prediction I predict that as the concentration of the hydrochloric acid increases, the time taken for the magnesium to disappear decreases. I predict that when the concentration of the hydrochloric acid doubles, the rate of the reaction doubles.

Linking prediction to theory reaction rate and concentration. The collision theory describes how the rate of reaction increase the time taken for the magnesium ribbon to disappear when it is reacted with hydrochloric acid when the concentration of HCL increases.

The theory states that if, the more concentrated the reactants, the greater the number of collisions between particles increase.

I think that with a raise in the concentration of the reactant will result in the increase in the rate of the reaction I am to investigate what effects concentration of the reactant hydrochloric acid has on the rate of reaction between This also explains why the greatest rate of reaction is usually as soon as the reactants have been mixed, i.

Rate of Reaction of Magnesium and Hydrochloric Acid Introduction In acid-base chemical reactions, there are four main variables, which influence the rate of reaction. Aim The aim of this investigation is to find out how concentration of acid affects the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon. Hydrochloric acid is a common laboratory acid. Extracts from: a chemistry coursework from an Internet source and The HUTCHINSON Dictionary of SCIENCE second edition. Before looking at the. The main substances that were used in the experiment were hydrochloric acid (HCL) and magnesium ribbon(Mg) when these materials combined there was a chemical reaction, the reaction was that there was bubbling and fizzing when the magnesium dissolved, there was a pattern when the temperatures changed, the molecules in the acid would change speed.

As the reaction continues, the concentration of the reacting substances decreases and so does the rate of reaction.

We must consider what happens when a reaction takes place. First of all the particles of the reacting substances must collide with each other, and secondly a fixed amount of energy called activation energy Ea must be reached if the reaction is to take place.

If the particles can produce the right amount of energy i.

Magnesium and hydrochloric acid coursework

The reaction is speeded up if the number of collisions is increased. In this investigation we must consider the topic of variables. Clearly, the time taken for the magnesium to disappear when it is placed in different concentrations of HCL is related in some way.

Magnesium and hydrochloric acid coursework

The higher the concentration of HCL I use, the less time it takes for the magnesium to disappear and so the rate reaction increases.

The concentration of HCL used is independant variable because it will vary, and the time taken for the rate of reaction to take place i. Other variables throughout the investigation, which will vary are the volume of water used, and the volume of hydrochloric acid.

The variables which will remain unchanged are the temperature room temperature will stay the same in order for it to be a fair test, because if the temperature changes it will effect the rate of reaction between the reactants, either by speeding it up if the temperature rises because the particles move faster and travel a greater distance in a given time and so will be involved in more collisions.

Or the temperature may slow the reaction down due to particles moving slower. The amount of magnesium used will stay the same 2 cm longso that it is a fair test. The time it takes for the magnesium to disappear will be measured accurately using a stop clock as soon as the HCL is poured into beaker with the magnesium in it.

If the activation energy is high only a small amount of particles will have Using larger concentrations of acid would give a bigger more accurate conclusion instead This way most results will be accurate.

It is important to keep the reactants separate while setting up the apparatus so that the starting time of the reaction will be measured accurately. Factors that may not be easy to control are, how well the solution is mixed when it is diluted, to get the correct concentration.

A way to come around could be stirring the test tube twice, or shaking the test tube twice. This factor is quite important because it determines exactly what the concentration of the solution is each time it is mixed, if the stirring factor is not carefully controlled it could lead to inaccurate results if the concentration of the acid solution is not what we calculated it to be.

The minimum amount of energy that is required to break the bonds is called activation energy Ea. If the activation energy is high only a small amount of particles will have enough energy to react so the reaction rate would be very small, however the activation energy is very low the number of particles with that amount of energy would be so high, so start, so the reaction rate would be higher.

An example of low Ea would be in explosives when they only need a small input of energy to start their exceed ly exothermic reactions. A change in concentration is a change in the number of particles in a given volume. If I increase the volume: Before starting the investigation, I decided to do some research about magnesium and hydrochloric acid.The reaction between magnesium and hydrochloric acid combine to form a salt of magnesium chloride and release hydrogen gas.

This single replacement reaction is a classic example of a metal reacting in an acid to release hydrogen gas. Should fluorine be added to water? Introduction: Fluoride is a natural mineral and a chemical, which is a compound of fluorine that is the most commonly used in water sources.

between magnesium and hydrochloric acid. GRAPH I will measure the rate of reaction by timing how long the reaction takes. GCSE Chemistry Coursework Investigation] Research Papers words ( pages) Rates of Reaction Essay - Rates of Reaction What is a rate of reaction.

The amount of change of a product or reactant in a given time. What. Aim The aim of this investigation is to find out how concentration of acid affects the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon. Hydrochloric acid is a common laboratory acid.

Extracts from: a chemistry coursework from an Internet source and The HUTCHINSON Dictionary of SCIENCE second edition.

Before looking at the. Science Coursework: Rate of Reaction The Aim of the experiment: In this experiment I will investigate the relationship between the concentration of the hydrochloric acid and the rate of a reaction.

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To find this out I will react different concentration of hydrochloric acid and magnesium, from there I will monitor the gas (hydrogen) produced and. 3 cm of magnesium ribbon typically has a mass of g and yields 40 cm 3 of hydrogen when reacted with excess acid. 50 cm 3 of 1M hydrochloric acid is a six-fold excess of acid.

In this reaction, the magnesium and acid are gradually used up.

What's the balanced equation for magnesium and hydrochloric acid? | Socratic